White Butter Roux

Ingredients

  • 1 C. butter
  • 1 C. All Purpose Flour


Directions

  1. In a heavy bottomed skillet, melt butter over medium high heat.
  2. Whisk in flour, stirring constantly until the flour and the butter are well blended and bubbly.
  3. Do not brown.


This roux can be used in béchamel, cream sauce, and soup.

Recipe compliments of Debra Taghehchian based on a recipe found in The Encyclopedia of Cajun & Creole Cuisine p. 133


Light Brown Cajun Roux

Ingredients

  • 1 C. Vegetable Oil
  • 1 C. All Purpose Flour


Directions

  1. In a cast iron pot or skillet, heat oil over medium high heat to approximately 325 degrees F.
  2. Slowly whisk in flour, stirring constantly.
  3. Cook until is peanut butter in color.
  4. If not using immediately, remove from skillet and allow to cool.


This roux is normally used in etouffee and fricassee.

Recipe compliments of Debra Taghehchian based on a recipe found in The Encyclopedia of Cajun & Creole Cuisine p. 130-132


Dark Brown Cajun Roux

Ingredients

  • 1 C. Vegetable Oil
  • 1 C. All Purpose Flour


Directions

  1. In a cast iron pot or skillet, heat oil to approximately 360 degrees F.
  2. Slowly whisk in flour, stirring roux constantly until roux is caramel or milk chocolate in color.
  3. It should be twice as dark as the light brown roux.
  4. The final temperature should be 385 – 395 degrees F.  
  5. You should remember that the darker the roux becomes, the less thickening power it holds and the more bitter it will become.  
  6. If not using immediately, remove from skillet and allow roux to cool.  This will prevent the roux from continuing to cook.


This roux is often used in gumbo, sauce piquant, crawfish bisque and many other Cajun dishes.

Recipe compliments of Debra Taghehchian based on a recipe found in The Encyclopedia of Cajun & Creole Cuisine p. 131


Brown Butter Roux

Ingredients

  • 1 C. Butter
  • 1 C. All Purpose Flour


Directions

  1. In a heavy bottomed skillet, melt butter over medium-high heat.
  2. Whisk in flour, stirring constantly until roux becomes light brown or caramel in color.
  3. Continue whisking during the cooking process, as flour tends to scorch when browning begins.  
  4. Should black specks appear in the roux, discard and begin again.


This roux is used to thicken gravies and sauces.

Recipe compliments of Debra Taghehchian based on a recipe found in The Encyclopedia of Cajun & Creole Cuisine p. 133

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